News

26 May 2021

EDGE London opens its first leading resource center for sustainability minded brands in the interior design and build space.

EDGE London opens its first leading resource center for sustainability minded brands in the interior design and build space.

The approximately 2400 square-foot EDGE center will offer solutions at the forefront of the eco and sustainable design movement.

Spread over 3 floors, EDGE offers a continually evolving, design-led showcase of stimulating materials, collaborative workspaces and on-hand advice for professionals and public alike. EDGE will be playing host to open and inspiring talks, CPD’s and workshops to help enrich the debate and foster a legacy surrounding sustainability

Matter of Stuff – Mogu Mycelium Acoustic Panels

Matter of Stuff – Mogu Mycelium Acoustic Panels

As part of London Design Festival, Sofia Steffenoni, Founder and Director of Matter of Stuff,
presented a talk on an exciting new innovation from Mogu
About Mater of Stuff
Matter of Stuff is a furniture procurement and manufacturing consultancy that provides a new
approach to curating knowledge, network and crafts, with a strong emphasis on
sustainability. They are dedicated to researching new craftsmen, materials and new
manufacturing processes in order to offer clients a service that selects, procures and
produces exclusive design objects for commercial and residential applications. Matter of
Stuff’s range of procured products include items derived from clay plaster, hand-carved
wood, cork, recycled paper, natural fibres and recycled plastics.
Their materials and products feature unique technical properties and radically innovative
aesthetics. Their aim is to inspire a more conscious relationship with the value, processes
and life cycle of materials surrounding us in everyday life.
Mogu’s mycelium panels
One of the latest additions to Matter of Stuff’s portfolio of innovative and cutting-edge
products is Mogu’s mycelium panels.
Mogu was founded on the belief that it is possible to employ nature’s tried and tested
materials and architecture to radically disrupt the design of everyday products, and over the
last several years, Mogu has explored the idea of biofabrication, and the potential of
mycelium-based technologies as a sustainable and quality alternative for interior design
products. Today, Mogu offers the first commercial mycelium-based products on the market
for interior design applications. It uses only residues as raw input materials, setting new
standard for resource protection and longevity.
Research into mycelium for commercial and design applications is in its relative infancy,
however Mogu is leading the field. Mycelium is a network that grows in the soil that
generates a fruit – mushroom. Mogu produces products and materials by growing selected
strains of mycelium on pre-engineered substrates made of agro-industrial residues. Finely
ground residual waste fibres are placed into plastic bags along with the mycelium and left for
some time for the mycelium network to grow and form, following which the substance is
moulded into the desired shape. The mycelium acts like a glue, binding the fibres together
within a dense network. After the desired shape has been achieved, for it to be retained, the
product is then heated in order to halt the mycelium’s metabolism and prevent further
growth.
Different strains of mycelium have different applications, which makes the substance
extremely commercially desirable. It is also highly sustainable given that it is grown entirely
naturally, without the need for toxic chemicals, and is 100 per cent biodegradable and
infinitely regenerative. Given their mycelium-network-based structure, the panels produced
by Mogu have excellent acoustic properties, making them ideal for noise insulation in interior
surfaces. They are also light and soft, but highly durable.

Mogu have great ambitions for the potential of mycelium in applications far beyond interior
design. They believe that mycelium-based products have the potential to revolutionise the
industry, and significantly contribute to the advancement of the commercial sector’s
sustainability efforts.
As part of its own sustainability goals, Matter of Stuff measures the carbon footprint of all of
its furniture projects and is currently involved in planting trees in order to contribute to the
rewilding and reforestation of the Scottish Highlands.
To find out more about Matter of Stuff, visit the website, or to find out more about Mogu and
mycelium-based technologies, see here. To see Matter of Stuff and Mogu’s products first-
hand, visit EDGE London’s showroom by booking an appointment through the website or by
calling them at 020 3876 7093.

Circularity for glass in London architecture

Circularity for glass in London architecture

During London Design Week, EDGE London hosted a number of talks on London’s Circular Economy
for Design and Construction. During the week, Andrew Savile, architect and the Director of Low
Impact Ltd, spoke about the ‘Circularity for Glass in London Architecture’ with MAGNA.
What is MAGNA glass?
MAGNA is an exciting material that we produce that is fulfilling a lot of the UN’s sustainability goals.
This is a product that is cutting-edge in the market because it doesn’t need resin (which cannot be
recycled). MAGNA is a product that recycles glass, but we don’t add anything to it, so this allows for
circular use, and recyclability at end of life.
Glass is one of the largest waste streams. There are two outflows, one from construction industry
demolition, and the second from producing flat glass and bottling glass. When glass is producd, it is a
24/7 operation, so there is a lot of overrun and need for product to go back to beginning of the
process and be reused. When you take glass from a manufacturer, you have to heat it at a very high
temperature and the carbon footprint of that is massive. Instead, we buy the glass as waste stream,
reprocess it and upcycle it rather than recycling it.
MAGNA sustainability accreditations
 EPD
 SolarImpulse
 Cradle to Cradle – gold rated
 DGNB
 LEED

How it works
We bring together the glass by crystalising, thereby removing the need for extremely high
temperatures. Glass has a natural crystalising level of about 760 degrees, and if you can crystalise
glass you can bring all the pieces together. The idea originated in the period when we were trying to
get rid of old television sets.
1. Material and recycling: MAGNA purchases glass from an EU hub of glass production close to
the factory. MAGNA purchases part of the 5 per cent waste stream from manufacturers. We
break it in a certain way, lay the glass out evenly by hand on a cullet, and it then goes through
a process to check for potential faults.
2. Melting and cooling: This then moves on tracks under gas fired ovens, whose energy is
provided by solar panels on the roof, while having full recyclability of water as well. We bring
the temperature of cullet up to the temperature of crystallisation, so it becomes a toffee like
consistency. Then it moves into different hoods, to control cool it, so that it won’t split. It is
annealed glass, that won’t splinter.
3. Cut and refine: After the panels have cooled down, they are refined by hand in the finishing
department. We polish each plate with attention to detail or give it a matt finish. It is then
shaped by water jet cut it, or UV glass glue to bond it to refine it to your finished product. It
has similar properties to stone or ceramic.
4. Your piece of furniture/glass: After these elaborate processes, a sustainable, yet extremely
elegant and luxurious piece of furniture has been created.
Colours of MAGNA
From different original glass materials, we can produce the following colours:
 Polar white – from solar panels
 Ice nugget – from transparent glass
 Jade green – from standard float glass with iron in it

 Sky blue – from water bottles
 Ocean blue - from water bottles
 Forest green – from wine bottles
 Champagne brown – from champagne bottles
 Pearl Black – from solar protection and tinted glass
Due to the unique arrangement of the broken glass, you will always receive a one-of-a-kind product
that is unique in the world and a large number of working hours go into every product that we
create. The attention to detail, the recycled material and the complex and environmentally friendly
production process make your MAGNA Atelier product something very special.

To see examples of MAGNA Atelier products, visit the EDGE showroom in London, 146 Marylebone
Road NW1 5PH.
For more information on MAGNA please visit https://magna-atelier.de/

Smile about plastics – materials reimagined, designed to inspire

Smile about plastics – materials reimagined, designed to inspire

About Smile Plastics
We launched in 2014 with two main missions: to create the most beautiful circular plastics in the world –
100 per cent recycled and 100 per cent recyclable materials, and to challenge ideas about ‘waste’ and the
system that creates it.
Our micro factory is situated in a beautiful spot near Swansea, South Wales. Our products have been
used in many different iterations of retail display and in the hospitality sector across the nation; we’ve had
some incredible clients, like Dior and Selfridges.
How Smile Plastics are made
We create unique mixes in a stringent way. Each material is a pure polymer type, which means that it's
100 per cent recycled material. There's absolutely nothing else apart from a small amount of pigment.
Even if it's coloured or if we create something bespoke for you, it's still 100 per cent recyclable. We’re all
about the ‘conscious community’ and industrial ecosystem.
We use local and national raw material streams which bring single-use plastics to our micro-factory. Our
products start life as a mixed quality, which we then take through pioneering technology that we created
specifically for Smile Plastics products. We are the largest producers of recycled plastic panels in Europe;
our standard size is 3 x 1.2 metre panels, which is about the height of a room.
We have a core production range of classics collection - we then add on designs and build to increase the
value. We do a customisable range, where we can make Smile Plastic products out of specific recycled
plastics (e.g., yoghurt pots), or heat them to form a specific shape.
Circularity: Smile Plastics buy-back scheme
Smile Plastics customers buy into a zero-waste buy-back scheme, so once you’re done with the product,
we repurpose it all over again.
Our technology ensures that the integrity of the polymers stays as close to virgin quality as possible. We
keep our temperatures low - this means that we maintain carbon footprint approximately 60 per cent
lower than conventional post-consumer recycling, and hopefully our materials will never enter the waste
stream or landfill.
That’s exactly what we’re all about – re-cycling once is great, but why not re-process materials over and
over again?
The future looks bright for infinitely recyclable plastics
We’re in the process of rolling out our processing technology to other micro-factories in beautiful sites
across the UK. We’d like to tailor our approach to address the local problems in local areas, and
eventually we’d love to get our technology to level nine globally.
Quality is so important to us, so our products are built to last. They are solid to their core, mould-resistant,
rock proof, resistant to moderate levels of UV and chemical resistant. We firmly believe that there isn’t
much point creating products if they aren’t fit for purpose.

In the process of removing plastic from the global waste stream, we make sure that you don’t have to
compromise on aesthetics. Now, perhaps for the first time, we can smile about plastics.
[insert images]

Smile Plastics are showcasing their classics range at the EDGE London Showroom. To speak to a
consultant, please call EDGE London on 020 3876 7093.
For more information about Smile Plastics, please visit their website.

Sound from cacophony to harmony

Sound from cacophony to harmony

David O'Coimin: I think we’re in a really bad moment with sound, it feels like a bit of a disaster as the
sound scape in our world has evolved. And it’s actually one of the main reasons I started doing Nook
6 years ago; I wanted to talk about sound and the effect it has on our environment. In terms of clarity
of speech, how does acoustic treatment help, especially if the space is noisy?
Luke Warwick: If you think about busy open-plan offices and people trying to all work, the
soundscape starts to become overwhelmed. Things become a bit tricky because people find it hard to
concentrate. Sound is one of our main sensors, and it’s often how we perceive our entire
environment. Therefore, the soundscape is absolutely vital.
DOC: In [the Edge showroom], I feel like we have a good acoustic soundscape, I don’t feel like my
own voice is bouncing back at me. The elements in the room have an effect on how my voice sounds.
Is that the case?
Gavin Brightman: Yes, in an office there is often a large amount of reverberation. A lot of offices
have many hard surfaces, which is fashionable, but it makes sounds bounce around. It affects people
in different ways - some people will notice whilst others will lose concentration and not know why.
DOC: Because we’ve moved away from carpet and towards more industrial chic, we're in one of our
worst moments in terms of sound. We’ve created an echo chamber.
GB: And we look to solve that in a number of ways. With wall panels and ceiling treatment.
DOC: So, tell us about the different ways you can treat a space?
LW: We like to pitch that every surface is an opportunity, and there is a lot of negative space in the
workplace. We often start with the ceiling, as it is the least trafficked area, and we code which material
is right for the job.
DOC: And in terms of those material choices, it’s especially important to think about environmental
factors and sustainability. There are obviously challenges and opportunities. We all need to make
sure that products are durable and changeable, but also sustainable. What opportunities and
challenges are there when it comes to choosing sustainability in the context of sound?
LW: The technical aspect is often the most challenging part because of increasingly stringent building
regulations. There needs to be a bigger demand for testing and certification of these environmentally
friendly materials. Another challenge is linearity - I.e., when an architect wants to repeat a certain
look, but this isn’t always possible with sustainable materials.
GB: The longevity of product is obviously extremely important to us. Do you want to tell us about the
Nook?
DOC: I believe that sound has have a profound effect on our brain. I think that because our
soundscape has become so toxic, that it is exclusionary - it makes people unable to last very long in a
space. Roughly 40 per cent of people are highly sensitive to sound. I was fed up with sound in the
workplace, and I wanted to provide a sanctuary in that cacophony of sound, a place of harmony. I
have seen you guys invent things; can you tell us about the drums you created?
LW: We brought a modular product to market, whereby you can stick material to it and vary the scale.
It adds tremendous value for the client, as it gets considerably more than one singular use. The
product is essentially a big sieve that soaks in high frequency noise. It looks like a hollow tube, and
it’s targeted towards the 400HZ – 10,000HZ range, which is important to absorb for clarity.

DOC: And why is that? Is that why we hate [the frequency of] baby screams?
LW: It takes the harshness out of sound and softens the blow. It just means that your audience is
more susceptible actually hearing to what you are saying.
DOC: We walked into this office room the other day. They called it ‘the sanctuary’, but it was all hard
walls, and you definitely couldn’t have an intimate conversation in there. The room’s saving grace was
that it had a ‘sound sink’ that they had put in the space - a sofa.
LW: The reason that works so well is because of random incidence, which is where sound waves
want to travel through a material. If you only present it with a high reflective surface, it will bounce off.
You can maximise the absorption by having reflective surfaces reintroducing sound to the sound sink
again and again that sits in the middle. That is where the modular piece works really well, because it’s
circular.
GB: If you go back to the carpet, you only have a few millimetres there of absorption whereas from
the ceiling, you can have more millimetres to absorb.
DOC: I think nature is also a great tool for absorption.
GB: Because it’s so random, you can’t test the acoustics of it. But it is a good way to absorb sound.
LW: Nature does work well in that it traps air.
DOC: You also realise that we are just at the start of the sustainability journey. These products are
not just positive for the planet, but also for the mind, engagement and inclusivity. Nook caters for the
differences that exist in our brains. It’s all about recognising that we are all on a spectrum of
neurodiversity. We want to give little pockets in the environment that cater specifically to those who
are sensitive to sensory overload. That’s a little haven!
GB: How can sound sinks and pods unlock people’s superpowers?
DOC: There is incredible talent working amongst us, but we are suppressing superpowers because of
the workspace and culture we are forcing upon people. If you provide good acoustics, sound can
unlock a whole different side to people. We must not forget that the world is full of hidden disabilities
and conditions. Neurotypical introverts often can’t last long in social spaces, and that has a lot to do
with the sound in a space.
LW: In a really noisy room it is physically taxing for your brain to decipher where sound is coming
from. When we design a recording studio, we use absorption to make this mental process much
easier. Not offering people the opportunity to escape the cacophony of sound has a huge impact on
mental fatigue and wellness.
DOC: At Nook, we look at how the environment we create can give people the tools and permission
to be themselves.
LW: In education, we promote tolerance, but that often stops when it comes to the workplace.
Employers are often dismissive those who get distracted by sound.
GB: It is sometimes at blueprint stage that these decisions need to be made.
DOC: A lot of times it’s a middle aged, white male extrovert who is creating spaces for avatars of
themselves. We can move forward, and away from this approach, by asking advisors like us to help
design workspaces.
LW: We work with people, and use different elements to expand upon their current catalogues.
GB: We are often brought in when people realise they have a sound problem. But, we’d love to be
brought in earlier to solve it from a blueprint stage.
DOC: What are the common mistakes that you see people make?

LW: Probably the most common mistake is offering a ‘sanctuary space’ which is open plan, filled with
hard surfaces or covered in glass.
GB: Often we also see sound travelling through dividers. For example, we had an issue once where
an HR department could hear everything that went on in the ladies' toilets, and vice versa. If we had
seen the plans before, we would have spotted the issue.
DOC: Having open offices can also be an issue because there is nowhere to sit with your back to the
wall, meaning everyone is essentially under a spotlight. People don’t like to be in the spotlight. Whilst
the office should be a collaborative space, nobody needs to collaborate all day long.
DOC: People are focused on their mental health more than ever before.
GB: You have people who are used to their own environment from working from home throughout the
pandemic. Now, to try get people back into the office and they will notice these issues even more.
DOC: What about in the home? We often don’t have a space at home just for quiet time.
LW: We are often inundated with questions about the household – the answer is sometimes in the
infrastructure because people are being condensed into smaller spaces. To solve these sound issues,
your construction must be invasive by ripping down walls and changing the substrate. So, people can
solve that in the design level with acoustic solutions.
DOC: People are looking at their homes as their sanctuary, having stayed at home for so long.
LW: Our homes are overworked at the moment.
DOC: I’m looking forward to seeing some of the projects you have going on.

At EDGE, a Nook is on display. To visit please speak to a consultant from EDGE at 020 3876 7093.
For more information on Nook please visit https://nookpod.com/ and for Sound Zero Acoustics visit
https://sound-zero.com/.

Gencork: Sustainability, creativity, technology & human emotions in seamless dialogue

Gencork: Sustainability, creativity, technology & human emotions in seamless dialogue

About Gencork
We’re a creative family – a brand of cork solutions that explores the symbiosis between a low-tech
material and high-tech processes. The 100 per cent natural and sustainable expanded cork agglomerate
is transformed through computational algorithms based on generative design, with strong inspiration in
biology, mathematic, and geometry. We use parametric design to create unique and beautiful freeform
cork walls.
[Insert image of Gencork family]

Parametric design simplified
At Gencork, we don’t have fixed rules about what our final products should look like. Rather, we adjust
parameters and have a design that can be changed and adapted to suit any needs. We use a process of
visual programming by starting with simple lines, identifying the geometry, and generating the final form
using a computer ‘language’.
Then, we arrive at algorithms – each pattern represents its own algorithm. We have parameters that we
can change to modulate every wall and make it unique for the space. A combination of algorithms
generates these one-of-a-kind cork walls.
Below are some standard algorithms that we can use:
[Insert slide]
Key to our product design is this action painting. This process is very visceral – it happens in the moment.
Our Corkllection
The patterns in our corkllection are all inspired by research on science and technology.
For example, CORKBIOMORPH is based on the biometric; we find potential curves in forcefields and
electric charges that display fluidity.
For CORKMETAMORPH, we were inspired by the mathematical and geometric art of M.C. Escher. We
used tessellations and grid formations to arrive at this pattern, which can evolve into different iterations for
different projects.
CORKOPTICAL was similarly inspired by optical art by Victor Vasarely and Bridget Riley, and also grid
deformations and 3D vector fields that create a set of new spatial perspectives.
[Insert images of each pattern, Gencork showcase their Corkllection at the EDGE London showroom. To view their products and to
speak to a consultant, please call 020 3876 7093.  

For more information on Gencork, please visit the  website.

The new Cosentino series made using Hybriq+ technology

The new Cosentino series made using Hybriq+ technology

Cosentino Present: Sunlit Days

The new Cosentino series made using Hybriq+ technology

As part of London Design Festival, Daniel Barnes, a specification manager at Cosentino, hosted a talk
on the company’s innovative new surfaces range, Sunlit Days

About Cosentino
Cosentino is a leading stone and marble surface producer and contractor for the home and business
sectors, at the forefront of state-of-the-art innovation. Founded in Almería, Spain in 1979 by the
Cosentino brothers, they now operate in 80 countries across five continents, and Cosentino remains a
family business until this day.
Sunlit Days
Their latest product, Sunlit Days, part of the Silestone interior surfaces range, is Cosentino’s first
carbon-neutral Silestone series. Made using HybriQ(+) technology, a pioneering manufacturing
process that blends cutting-edge design with functionality and sustainable architecture, it allows Sunlit
Days to be produced carbon-neutrally. The process produces the same high performance materials
whilst minimising environmental impact and drastically lowering the percentage of crystalline silica
(which, if inhaled, can be harmful) to a maximum concentration of 15 per cent. Sunlit Days is made
using 100 per cent recycled water and recycled materials (such as glass, with Hybriq+ guaranteeing a
minimum of 20 per cent recycled material composition) and minerals, as well as being powered by
100 per cent renewable energy.
As part of its other initiatives to become more sustainable as an organisation, Cosentino now offsets
all emissions, and works with partners such as SOS La Santa Maria to clean-up our beaches and
preserve natural environments for generations to come.

To find out more about Cosentino, visit their website here. To see their materials, book your visit to
the EDGE London showroom by going to the Contact Us page or calling them at 020 3876 7093.

Camira: sustainability and innovation in contract fabrics

Camira: sustainability and innovation in contract fabrics

As part of London Design Festival, Alexia Desile, architect and designer advisor hosted a
talk on sustainability and innovation in contract fabrics in the EDGE showroom.
About Camira
Camira is a British natural fabric manufacturer, producing nine million metres of material
every year out of their factory in Yorkshire. We operate across the entire manufacturing
chain, from sourcing, dying, designing, producing yarn, weaving, to sustainability innovation.
As with all EGDE partner brands, sustainability is at the heart of what we do.
With what would be called by now “traditional” synthetic materials that so much of our fabrics
are made from, these are typically plastic-based. Plastic requires crude oil in order to be
produced, the mining and extraction of which is highly carbon intensive and polluting in and
of itself. And despite the ubiquity of synthetic fibres, they are only a fairly recent
development, having been first created in the 1930s. Due to the relatively cheaper costs of
producing synthetic fibres compared with sourcing natural fibres, synthetic fibres have
exploded in the market, and become extremely popular with manufacturers seeking to
reduce their overheads. However, Camira wants to reverse this trend and rediscover our
heritage as it relates to traditional textile sourcing, craftsmanship and production using
natural materials, and raise awareness about the environmental impact of the synthetic fibre
industry, particularly during a time in which people are becoming increasingly aware and
concerned about issues such as sustainability and circularity.
Camira’s recycled materials
Recycled ocean waste
As well as trying to repopularise traditional production methods and natural materials,
Camira is also producing textiles made from recycled materials - and we were the first
fabrics manufacturer to do so. One of our fabrics, Oceanic, is made from recycled ocean
waste. We work with Seaqual, an organisation that partners with NGOs and fishermen to
recycle the plastic waste that they collect from the oceans in order to produce yarn. 26
plastic bottles are able to produce one metre of our Oceanic fabric.
Today, most fabrics on the market are made from synthetic fibres, such as polyester, with a
sizeable minority being cotton-based, but with very few using sustainable, natural fibres.
Although cotton is a natural material, its production is highly water-intensive, making it one of
the least sustainable natural materials for textile production.
Wool
Camira works with the Campaign for Wool, an organisation backed by Prince Charles, which
is working to encourage consumers and brands to recognise the benefits of wool as a
source material. Given its nature, wool is annually renewable, and can be sourced from 200
breeds of sheep, with one sheep shear providing ten metres of fabric. Wool is also a keratin-
based protein, similar to human hair, which makes it a lot easier to dye than synthetic fibres,
as well as decomposing naturally and therefore reducing waste. Wool is a highly insulative
material, protecting sheep through the winter, and was used in generations past as bedding
for crops and plants in order to prevent food loss to frost. Wool’s natural properties provide it
with excellent longevity, as a result of its chemical make-up, particularly the waxy cuticles
that layer it, as well as being particularly elastic, making it more durable and well-fitting.

Plant-based sources
Camira also work with British farmers to source and utilise bast fibre in our fabrics. Bast
fibres refers to plant-based fibres that are taken from the stem of a plant, as opposed to
cotton, which is derived from the seed. Types of plants that are used include nettle, hemp
and flax. Whereas cotton requires a large amount of pesticides to grow, bast fibre plants do
not, and are water-efficient, as well as providing hospitable habitats for wildlife and enriching
the ecosystem, and are able to be harvested more frequently - every six months in the case
of nettle. Our bast-fibre-based materials are always mixed with wool in order to produce
textiles with the optimum degree of comfort and flexibility. Crucially, natural fibres such as
cotton and bast are far more flame retardant than synthetic fibres, which allow fires to
propagate, whereas natural fibres create char that allows the fire to burn itself out.
Ultimately, natural fibres have a far smaller carbon footprint than their synthetic equivalents,
and have many natural properties that make them superior products. Though they may be
more expensive initially, they are typically produced with better craftsmanship and will have
a longer life, being more durable and resistant to wear, and will produce a better value on
investment over the long-term. And by purchasing products from Camira, consumers are
supporting both the environment and local farmers and workers throughout the UK, which is
an invaluable investment.
To see and feel Camira fabrics, visit EDGE London or please speak to a consultant from
Edge at 020 3876 7093.
For more information on Camira please visit https://www.camirafabrics.com/en